Learn how to interpret the most important Facebook Insights

Today’s post is by Shaun Hautly, of boom.reactive

For many businesses, Facebook provides an opportunity to connect with millions of consumers. The ability to share content and see what your friends are doing is a powerful way to grow your fan base with targeted relevance. So every like, comment, and share gets echoed out to friends of friends, and their friends, and so on.

Facebook tracks EVERY one of these clicks, views, and shares. They can tell who’s seen a post, how many of their friends have seen it, and so much more. All this information is available to the administrators of a page. Understanding how to interpret this data can be remarkably helpful in refining your page’s approach to Social Media to achieve optimum effectiveness.

When you click on the Insights of your page, you’ll see a graph of the common pieces of information, likes, impressions, etc. Just below that is a digest of all recent posts with several pieces of information for each.

Here are three pieces that represent quick, easy ways to measure the effectiveness of your page.

1) Friends of Fans

fb friends of fans

This stat can be more important than the number of likes your page has. This number indicates the potential reach of any given post. As your fans interact with your posts, their friends have the opportunity to see those interactions and be exposed to your page. Your Page Likes will grow almost exclusively from this pool of people. So to find out how to reach this 2nd degree more often, we look at the 2nd piece….

2) The Virality of a Post

fb post virality

The Virality of a post is the measurement of how many people commented, liked, or shared a story that they saw. So if tons of people see a post, but no one is inclined to comment or like it, it will have a low Virality. If a large number of people who see the post interact with it, the Virality will be higher. Look at your posts with the highest Virality; you may notice a pattern. In our case, the two highest posts were a link and a status which both pertained to other local interests. Using this, we can tweak our strategy to include most posts along similar lines

3) Like Sources

fb likes source

On the “Likes” tab of the insights page, you can see a breakdown of your demographics. While this is interesting, below that chart is another graph… “Where your likes came from.” This is a window to where your recent fans clicked the “Like” button.

The Page Browser is where someone searches for your page directly. Mobile applications, the timeline, and the page itself are other sources. Use these trends to find content geared for these platforms. Photos share well on mobile devices; videos have a higher play-rate from the Timeline and the Page itself. Recommendations can be a great source if you entice your fans to write them for you. So look at where your numbers are low and tweak your strategy to increase exposure to those sources.

Use your Insights properly to see what your fans actually appreciate. It may surprise you to find that some of the posts you’d expect to be great fail, and sometimes trivial, irrelevant posts help build your traffic more than you’d expect. Spend some time looking through your insights to tweak your strategy to please your fans.

shaun hautly boom.reactiveShaun Hautly started boom. reactive. in 2008. Together with Jon Becker, they enjoy running Social Media presences and consulting in St. Louis and around the country. Shaun enjoys Ultimate Frisbee, playing guitar, and hanging out with his dog, Mya.

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One Response to Learn how to interpret the most important Facebook Insights

  1. CAP says:

    How do I determine how many videos have been posted to my page?? I have over 267, 000 friends and fans, I can only have 5000 friends, how did the number grow so high? How can I tell where most of these 267 are?

    Please help

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