Facebook Ads Manager: It Ain’t Great, But It Ain’t Twitter

 

 

 

Twitter.down

You don’t see this on Facebook.

The Facebook Ads manager can be a pain at times. Something as simple as updating campaign budgets sometimes won’t save if you edit 16 rows at once, but will work fine if you edit them 15 at a time. Ever work with Facebook Power Editor? It can be very buggy when it comes to uploading and editing ads, but for the most part, you know where you stand – it either works or it doesn’t. No waiting required. Facebook has its little quirks, but in time you learn them and the workarounds become part of the routine.

I have learned to like the Facebook ad platform a bit more in the last few months…not due to any major updates that Facebook has put in place, but because of the failings of another ads manager that I have been working with: Twitter.

The Twitter self-serve Ad Platform is still young, so I can tolerate the limited features, such as the bare-bones layout and the lack of sorting options (among other things). What I cannot bear is the waiting. I never look forward to updating or working on Twitter paid content.

We live in a high-speed world. Our phones run on 4G LTE networks. Our laptops and PCs are plugged into high-speed cable. Even our bodies are working this way, whether it’s from the daily Starbucks run or from that cold can of Red Bull. We get things done and move on to the next project. There is no time for waiting. It’s the culture we live in: instant results, instant gratification. Twitter satisfies – pushes! – that pace on the front end with breaking news and updates, but when it comes to its ad platforms, there is so much to be desired.

Here’s a play-by-play. You log in, and you wait for the page to load. You click on the campaign that you would like to update, you wait about 10 seconds, and you’re in. You make your updates, you click on save, and sometimes you wait 10 or so seconds, but sometimes the page just hangs and you have to right-click and reload. Want to scroll down the page? You can’t, not for another 3 seconds. Want to click on the next campaign? You can’t, not for another 2 or 3 seconds. My favorite part of my Twitter ad experience is when my injured friend above makes an appearance. I’m happy because I know where I stand; it’s broken, and the waiting is done. Temporarily. Until I realize that I’m just delaying the inevitable.

This would be barely tolerable if you are working with a minimal set of campaigns, but try repeating this process 30 to 40 times. It’s incredibly frustrating when you are surrounded by all of this technology. If I can watch a video on my phone as I update my Facebook status, and then check my work email, surely I can update and save a campaign in the ad platform of the biggest instant-gratification driver in the world, right? Like I mentioned before, the platform is young and will improve, but in 2012, there really is no excuse for dial-up speeds. So thank you Facebook, not for being awesome but simply being average. I appreciate your platform even more, quirky workarounds and all, and you didn’t even have to do a thing.

- Clark Sioson, PPC Associates

Clark Sioson

About Clark Sioson

Clark Sioson is a Facebook account manager at 3Q Digital, a digital marketing agency based in the Bay Area, San Diego, and Chicago.
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2 Responses to Facebook Ads Manager: It Ain’t Great, But It Ain’t Twitter

  1. Morgan says:

    I cant access my Fcaebook Ad Manager and I wrote them since this past Friday and tomorrow is Friday and it still aint working…..What should I do.

    • Clark Sioson says:

      Hi Morgan,

      Unfortunately for Facebook, customer service is not their strong suit at the moment. I urge you to keep following up, and keep sending them your inquiry if you do not hear back within 24 hours.

      Thanks,
      Clark

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